TCWT Blog Chain Post

Once again, I am writing for TCWT in their blog chain, and this month’s prompt was:

“What is your greatest weakness as a writer? What’s your greatest strength?”

Ooh boy. There is a lot I can say about that. Let’s start with the first one, and move onto the good news later.

There are three things that come to mind: not enough detail, too much detail, and lack of perseverance.

1. Not enough detail: I skim over things I should spend more time on, like certain descriptions of things, or rushing through dialogue without adding the pauses to add in the thoughts going through people’s heads during a conversation.

2. Too much detail: I describe in excess certain things really unnecessary to the story. For example, I was writing a mini-story about a girl who was running away from home, and I described all the futuristic inventions she had with her.

3. Lack of perseverance: I start a story, really liking the idea, but then the enthusiasm wears off, and I find something else I like. I now have probably 50-100 half started stories on my computer or scattered around in notebooks.

My greatest strength…. I don’t know if this can be considered one, but I will sometimes have these amazing moments where I find exactly the right wording for a passage, and it just sounds amazing. I’ll share one with you now:

The ash-covered clock ticks alone under the death sky. It counts out heartbeats that will never be, breaths never to be taken, lives never completed. The crumbling windowsill threatens to tip it into the smoldering cinders; the wall is propped up only by a beam. A man with rusting silver eyes lies still on the ground; unmoving, unknowing, unliving. The soft tapping of metal hitting metal drifts on the wind, accompanied by the faintest strains of an accordion. For once, heaven is not a place one wants to be.

(for anyone who’s read the Book Thief, there you go)

Being a writer is more than just getting the words right, though. It has lots, if not more to do with the smooth flow of the plot, and the undercurrents of emotions and feelings that soar through the story and connect it at both ends.

I’d love to hear what you think 🙂

Tuesday May 5th — The Little Engine That Couldn’t

Wednesday May 6th — Ariel Kalati, Writer

Friday May 8th — Galloping Free

Saturday May 9th — Miriam Joy Writes

Sunday May 10th — The Ramblings of Aravis

Wednesday May 13th — Light and Shadows

Friday May 15th — Musings from Neville’s Navel

Saturday May 16th — The World of the Writer

Tuesday May 19th — Butterflies of the Imagination

Wednesday May 20th — Introspection Creative

Friday May 22nd — Spellbound

Sunday May 24th — Unikke Lyfe

Monday May 25th — The Long Life of a Lifelong Fangirl

Wednesday May 27th — Against the Shadows

Friday May 29th — Teens Can Write, Too, announcing June’s chain

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7 thoughts on “TCWT Blog Chain Post

  1. I love your excerpt! The description is phenomenal, and the “man with rusting silver eyes” and the last sentence make me curious about the rest of the story. I would definitely call that a strength!

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      • I was the same, and I think one of the things I enjoyed most about the book thief was the writing. He is such an amazing writer, and he definitely has the “get exactly the right words” thing

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      • WHAAT? Where is that? Is that Max or Hans? I’ve read that five times and I never saw that line!
        You know, you can publish scraps and bits as ‘flash fiction’, and if it’s vague enough people nod sagely and say you’re a genius, to make it seem like they have the foggiest idea what you’re talking about when everybody else doesn’t. (Where I come from they call this high art and it is the biggest rip-off in the history of history.)

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      • It’s Hans. It’s not a perfect quote as far as I can tell, but it is in the chapter where they get bombed, and when she goes out and sees her mama and papa dead. In my copy its the bottom of page 538.
        And no, I didn’t know that. Thanks 🙂

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  2. I have the not enough detail problem too! Once a friend got to the end of my book and then went, ‘What do your characters actually look like?’ Turned out I’d never really described them beyond name and approximate age. So, whoops.

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